Sunday, 23 November 2014

Aoshima kit No. 9 Maneuver Combat Vehicle

Aoshima released a model of the Maneuver Combat Vehicle (MCV) in development for the Japanese Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF). The model is based on the prototype of the vehicle from October 2013. The MCV is an 8-wheeled armoured car/wheeled tank equipped with a 105 mm AT gun in a turret. This makes it a vehicle very similar to the Italian B1 Centauro and in some lesser extend to the M1128 Stryker MGS which has a automated turret. These kind of vehicles are seen more and more in armies around the world because they are lighter in weight and can be flown to distant locations more easily then a 60 to 70 ton Main Battle Tank. The off-road performance, armour and armament are a lot less too however. The Canadian Army wanted to replace all it's MBT's with M1128's but experiences in the last years have completely turned that decision around. Japan also retains MBT's in it's army, namely the new Type 10 MBT. Like the Type 10 the MCV has modular armour as well which can be adapted to certain missions.

Video images of the real thing:

The model consists out of 68 parts, 42 for the main body and turret, 24 for the wheels and 4 clear parts for the lights. All parts have fine detail so don't put on a paint layer that is too thick! As with Revell's Boxer the wheels are molded as 3 discs making it possible to have both a wide and detailed wheel surface. The barrel is already hollowed out and all parts fit perfectly. There is no option to put the drivers hatch in 'road mode' as seen on the photo above of the all green prototype. All hatches are moulded separately so if you have JGSDF figures they can be used here! The real novelty of this model is in the suspension however. This is not very detailed since it can't be seen but Aoshima has chosen to make it functional. Like the real thing the whole vehicle can swing over it's longitudinal axes, in addition to this the 4 front wheels can steer. An intricate but robust system of parts make sure the 4 steering wheels move with each other. In order to make this all functional no glue needs to be applied in step 1 and 2 of the building instructions. A last remark about the grab handles, these are all moulded as solid protrusions, most of them are small but the three on the back and two on the turret rear will benefit from replacement with wire.

some photo's of parts on their sprue:

The suspension system before it is closed up, all these parts must be fitted without glue in order for the suspension and 'roll' system to work. On the other photo's the completed vehicle:

It's very nice to see a plastic model of this type of vehicle in 1/72 because there was none available so far. All parts look very well moulded and are nicely detailed. The model is not to complex as well, highly recommended for beginners as well.

Thursday, 9 October 2014

Winstons Wonder Weapon

The Mk.I tank

The 'tank' is really an invention of British in the first world war aimed to break the stalemate created on the muddy battlefields on western Europe. For it's development the landships committee was founded by Winston Churchill( yes indeed THE Winston Churchill ). Development began in 1915 with the first tanks appearing on the battlefield in 1916. 'Tank' was the codename for the vehicle, suggesting the development was aimed at water transport vehicles, the name never disappeared. The Mk.I was the first tank to rumble on the battlefield in a canon armed 'male' version or machinegun armed 'female' version. Many improvements could be made though. The Mk.I was vulnerable to fire of heavy riffles, it couldn't steer very well, the cabin became very hot and was to noisy for the eight men crew to hear each other. The fuel tank was located high in the vehicle so when the it was hit by a rifle fuel littered over the interior, crew and hot engine with a great risk of being ignited. Also these tanks are famous for getting stuck in the mud but this has to be relativated a bit. Before the tank there was noting able to get over the trenches and effectively support infantry. A tank was able to drive over the trenches in maybe half a minute, but with aircraft and infantry the trenches where unbridgeable gaps. The arrival of the Americans was a pivotal change in WWI but the tank employed a very important, often unappreciated, role as well. But when this tank entered the battlefield a lot had to be learned. The development of the original 'tank' led to a Mk.II and Mk.III version which where quite similar. Larger changes where implemented in the Mk.IV. Eventually the Mk.V from 1917 was last version of this specific tank and the Mk.V was really 'advanced' compared to the Mk.I, the same goes for the strategies developed for employing tanks. Mk.I's where converted to supply tanks, sort of turning them into the thing the codename 'tank' meant. This sounds a bit dull but don't forget this is World War I and there are barely any motorised transport vehicles, most of the stuff had to be moved to the battle field by horses, so this was a very important application of tanks too.

The masterbox model

Masterbox released two models of the MK.I, a male version (kit no. 720001 ) and a female (kit no. 720002 )in January of this year. The model has a few photo etched parts most noticeable the mesh for the top of the tank.

This was meant to deflect grenades but was removed from the Mk.II versions onward. The same goes for the auxiliary steering wheels in the back of the tank. This turned out to work counter productive and hinder manoeuvring instead of helping it. But this is the Mk.I and all these parts are here. The fit of the parts is quite perfect as is the detail. The only weak point are the places where the sprue of the track parts contact those parts, the tracks are deformed here. I placed my model in a diorama and of course there was a lot of mud on those tracks so the deformations can't be seen.

Sunday, 28 September 2014

TechTip IX: Non flat diorama surface

Techtip V was a tip for creating a flat diorama surface fast but what if you want to have non flat surface? In that case I recommend 'Oasis'/'floral sponge'/'designer blocks' etc:

No doubt everyone will have seen this foam and perhaps worked with it. It's properties are that it is light weight, easy to cut, easy to deform, it soaks up water very easy and is incredibly cheap. The fact that the foam can be cut and deform easily make it perfect to form diorama's surfaces:

There are also some downsides to this product. The fact that it soaks op water very easily makes it difficult to paint, I solved this problem by buying gouache and solving it in water. (Essentially I had water with a bit of paint instead of diluted paint. The 'paint' must be very this). Paint the sides and surface of your diorama appropriate. The easy deformability of this product turns into a downside once the surface has the right shape and should not be reshaped any more. This can be overcome by covering the surface in undiluted PVA glue after which it becomes very hard. After this step the surface can be covered with sand, scatter etc. Be sure holes for placing trees are present before applying the layer of PVA glue. In the diorama on the next photo I did after the PVA glue was dry and I really had hammer in the poles for the barbed wire creating far to big holes trough which the green oases can be seen. In the diorama 'Duel in the forest' in the second picture I applied the right order of working and the trees fit perfectly.

So the right order of working once more:

  1. Cut the foam to shape.
  2. Glue pieces together to make hills or large rock formations.
  3. Deform the surfaces into a more realistic shapes and add smaller features such as craters, tracks, ridges and footsteps.
  4. Stick in trees or other objects to create holes where they have to fitted, but remove those object for the time being.
  5. Paint the surface with paint which is diluted to make it as liquid as water.
  6. Cover the surface with undiluted PVA glue. You can also use this to fix sand, grass or snow you want to apply.
After these steps the diorama is ready to be finished as you would normally do.

Saturday, 30 August 2014

Maurits's Musketeer (MiniArt kit No. 16010)

I made MiniArt's Netherlands Musketeer (Kit. No. 16010) and have a review. This post has three subjects:

  • The eighty years war's history
  • The musket's history
  • The review of the figure

History of the eighty years war

During the rule of Karel V the 17 Dutch provinces (currently roughly Belgium and The Netherlands) where forged into a unity by this emperor. He was fiercely opposed by Karel Van Egmont, Duke of Gelre and Pier Gerlofs Donia the great Frisian but they finally had to give in and became part of the Burgundian Circle within the Holy Roman Empire, one of Karel V's domains. Within this setting the 17 provinces enjoyed a relatively great freedom most noticeable in the religious field.
This was all about to change fast when Karel V resigned from the throne and left the 17 provinces under the rule of his son Phillips II best known as the head of Spanish empire. He demanded that the strict and intolerant religious laws that officially existed under Karel V on paper be put in practise. News of this change in policy led to a rebellion known as 'Beeldenstorm' or 'iconoclasm'. Phillips political liaison in the 17 provinces, Margaret of Pharma, promised to be less strict after the noblemen of the Netherlands begged her to be more tolerant. The rebellion subsided when she did. Not every noblemen was convinced to stay in the Empire but they rebelled no more.


Ruined statues in the 'Dom kerk' in Utrecht, The Netherlands. A silent witness to a volatile time in history. Not something proud of it though considering other instances in history in which heritage was destroyed. Looking on the bright side, the event wasn't combined with murder, theft and rape.

Meanwhile news of the rebellion reached Phillips II in Madrid and he decided to grant not an inch of freedom and send Fernando Álvarez de Toledo better know as Alva 'The iron duke' to the 17 provinces. Alva was under direct command of Philips II and as such was not bound to listen to wishes or suggestions of the local noblemen led by Willem Van Nassau or Margaret of Pharma. His policy was characterised by 3 things: Punishment of the rebellious people including the dead penalty for many, enforcing the Catholic religion as the only religion and a heavy increase in taxation. Needles to say, Alva did not make himself popular giving plenty of reasons to rebel against the Spanish throne again. The first Dutch duke daring to challenge Alva's rule was Willem Van Nassau (also known as Willem Van Nassau or William the Silent), the highest, most important local noblemen of the Netherlands and the main political support of the Spanish throne in the 17 provinces. He explicitly challenged Alva's rule but not Phillips II's. The national Anthem of The Netherlands is called 'Het Wilhelmus' (The William) and describes, along with a lot of pious lines, the history of the eighty years war first years. The line 'den koning van Hispanje heb ik altijd geëerd' (the king of Spain I have always served) refers to this continuing loyalty to the Spanish throne. In 1568, the year seen as the start of eighty years war, the forces of Willem Van Nassau met Alva's forces in battle several times losing every time except the one in Heiligerlee. The brother of Willem, Adolf Van Nassau died in that battle however which was a big loss in an otherwise flawless victory. Willem Van Nassau fled to his place of birth in present day Germany. It seems a bit strange but his authority was never officially revoked by other noblemen from the provinces. Alva did revoke all his official titles and property in name of the Spanish empire however.


Paintings of Willem Van Nassau, Phillips II and Alva.


Verse 1, 2 and 6 of the Dutch anthem 'the William' with English translations.

At this moment the rebellion seemed to be over, the only ones openly supporting Willem Van Nassau openly where the 'Waterbeggers'. These people where a bunch of privateers that where stationed in the coastal provinces now mixed with many refugees fleeing from the Netherlands in fear of Alva. Willem Van Nassau allowed them to carry his Orange-White-Blue flag. They where forced to use English harbours as their main outpost because the Spanish empire reconsolidation of power in the 17 provinces. In 1572 Elisabeth the I of England drove the waterbeggers out of the English harbours because she wanted better relations with the Spanish crown. With nowhere to go the waterbeggers started an assault on the Netherlands led by people appointed by Willem Van Nassau and reconquered many cities on the cost. The provinces of Gelre and Friesland wasted no time joining Willem Van Orange. In the same year noblemen from cities met in their meeting or 'Staten Generaal' and reaffirming the status of Van Nassau as their prima interparis (first among his equals). The waterbeggers where not the most disciplined troops and couldn't resist pillaging from time to time which seriously angered Willem Van Orange. This let to the formation of groups with 1 commander for every 100 soldiers instead of 250 enforcing more dicipline among the waterbeggers which was an other important step taken in 1572. The official status of Willem Van Nassau is somewhat ambiguous at this moment because in the eyes of the Spanish throne he is still a title less men. Alva started an counter assault slaying the male population of reconquered cities and allowing the rape of women. The forces under Van Nassau where able to stop the Spanish from taking cities such as Alkmaar and Leiden. To celebrate the liberation of Leiden (Leidens ontzet) the first university in the Netherlands, the Universiteit Van Leiden was founded by Van Nassau, still in honor of Phillps II underlining that the rebellion was against Alva's strict rule only. Also a commemorative coin was made stating 'Haec Libertatis Ergo' or 'this is about freedom'.
It was clear to Phillips II that Alva's hardline politics worked counter productive. When Alva arrived things where almost back to normal as under Karel V and now half of 17 provinces where in an all out war against Alva who kept calling this an 'uprising'. He was releaved of his duty and the more moderate Don Requences took over. In 1575 there where peace negotiations but these failed. The uprising had gotten a very deep religious dimension and differences could not be overcome. In the period until 1588 the political distance between mostly the Northern provinces and Spanish empire grew larger. In 1581 the 'Plakkaat van Verlatinghe' or Act of Abjurcation was signed in which provinces of Brabant (NL), Gelre en Zutphen (NL), Vlaanderen (BE), Holland (NL), Zeeland (NL), Friesland (NL), Mechelen (BE) and Utrecht (NL) did not recognise Phillips II as sovereign ruler any more. Willem Van Nassau was seen as Steward of almost all the provinces. He was murdered in 1584 and in 1588 the Republic of the seven Provinces was officialy formed. The first political entity not to be ruled by a monarch in post-medieval Europe. In the 9 years between 1575 and 1588 the Spanish had quite some military successes. In the following 10 years they where forced on the retreat by the now 'Republic of the 7 provices'. The army of the republic was led by Maurits Van Nassau, son of Willem and his cousin Willem Lodewijk Steward of Friesland.


Maurits and Willem Lodewijk

Maurits was a sophisticated mathematician thought by Simon Stevin while Lodewijk was an enthusiastic student of military tactics. He was the first military commander of his day to study tactics the Romans and Byzantines employed in ancient times. Both of these men brought hard needed military expertise to the Republic's army resulting in many victories.

In the eleven years following nor the Empire nor the Republic gained the upper hand. In 1609 a peace treaty was signed lasting 12 years. From 1621 until 1648 the war continued. A noticable Spanish victory was the conquest of the Breda nicely depicted by the painter Velazquez. The depiction of respectful behaviour of both Spanish and Republic soldiers is accurate, their still was a war but the days of genocide where long past for both sides. Republic victories include the capture of the Spanish 'silver fleed' by Peit Hein and the conquest of Den Bosch by Ernst Casimir and Frederic Hendrik.


The surrender of Breda painted by Velazquez.


Siege and capture of Den Bosch by Ernst Casimir and Frederic Hendrik

In 1641 the first preparations for a definitive peace treaty started and it was signed in 1648 in Münster ending the eighty years war. This treaty was a part of other treaties known as the 'peace of Westphalia' ending several wars including the 30 years war.


Paining of signing ceremony for the peace treaty of Münster

History of the musket

The musket is the weapon which replaced the first mass used fire arm, the arquebus. The Musket became the most important weapon of armies all over the northern hemisphere in the 16th century and was replaced by the rifle around the half of the 19th century. What makes a musket a musket is the fact that the inside of barrel is smooth. A musket has to be loaded by first inserting gunpowder and than a bullet which where round. The powder and ball had to be pushed down by a rod. The musket was then placed on a stick to support the weight. The typical range in which you could shoot a musket with some precision was 70 meters maximum. It took along time to load and fire a musket and typically formations of musketeers had to be protected by men with pikes from cavalry. Maurits Van Nassau was a pioneer in developing tactics for formations of musketeers. In the last century muskets where equipped with bayonets, also they became lighter and more reliable as time and technology progressed. The musket was finally superseded by the rifle trough three innovations. Cartridge bullets (bullets with a gunpowder filled coper tube attached to the back enabling a gun to be loaded from the back of the barrel), bullets shaped as a pointed cylinder (decreasing the clearance between barrel and bullet) and rifled barrels (giving the bullet a spin resulting in a rotational motion of the bullet making it less prone to be deviated off course). The riffled barrel was known in the 16th century already but not used widely because technical difficulties not solved until the invention of the modern bullet described in fact by the first two inventions. A musketeer had a lot of accessors to fire and maintain it's weapon.


A musketeer from the 16th century.

The MiniArt figure

Miniart produced a figure of a musketeer from the 16th century marketed as 'Netherlands Musketeer' making it quite a unique product. For as far as I can see the figure is historically accurate. It's uniform looks very similar to the figure in the picture of Willem Van Nassau and Phillps II below.

It's helmet (1), shoulder pads (2), 'pantbuttons' (3) and thing on Willem's shoe (4) in the place we have our shoelaces these days are strikingly similar. It's collar looks a bit different but was also seen in these days.

The parts fit quite well except for the arms, these need quite some filler to be fitted properly. Other parts require the amount of sanding we got used to from this brand. An other weak part are the inner surfaces of the shoulder pads. They have a straight edge that can best be sanded of to make it look like the other side as moulded by MiniArt. Finally I replaced the moulded parts representing rope by thin cloth red-white-blue wire I braided. After the figure was painted I drilled small holes around the belt and pulled the wire through. This was not easy as the holes where too small to let a needle trough. I solved this problem by painting the first centimetre (2/5 inch) with thick paint and allowing that to dry forming a kind of 'needle'. The paint must be undiluted but must not be applied in a thick layer on the wire. I could only get the wire in from the outside of the figure so I had to cut the rope and tie it together on the inside of the figure. This procedure took me several hours due to many failures so think if you really want to do this before you start. Needless to say I glued the torso to the figure after this was completed. I printed a Orange-White-Blue flag, the flag of Willem Van Nassau with the inscription 'Haec Libertatis Ergo' on the white banner and attached to a painted skewer with a thin rope. The whole thing was attached to through a hole in the base. Enough history for now and on to the photo's! As always you can click on them for a larger version.

This is a nice figure from MiniArt. It may take a bit of work to make the figure but once this is done you have a quite good figure to paint. At a retail price of about €12,50 it is really a bargain and a change to make quite a unique model from an important and interesting time in history.

Special thanks to 'Don Italeri' for verifying the part on the history of the eighty years war.

Friday, 8 August 2014

Leopard 1A5DK

The Leopard I was the first real Main Battle Tank build by (West)-Germany after the second world war. Development started in 1956 and the first production vehicle was completed in 1965. There are basically 5 versions of the main battle tank version, small differences between country specific versions not included. The biggest differences between the A1/A2 and A3/A4 is the turret shape. the A1/A2 have a round turret while the A3/A4 versions have are boxshaped turret. Other differences are in the electronics, sighting systems etc. The A5 version is a result of a more thorough modernisation program in the '80's. All versions are armed with the British 105mm Royal Ordnance L7A3 L/52 rifled gun. The leopard I was used by more then a dozen countries from mainly Europe and South-America. Other versions of the leopard I include the anti-aircraft or FLaK version 'Grepard', a bridgelayer system 'beaver' and an engineering/recovery version.

Operation Bøllebank (Hooligan bashing)

UN PROFOR was the UN peace keeping force in the Balkans during the conflict there in the '90s. The Danish army was stationed there as well as a part of Norbat 2, the Scandinavian contribution to the mission. On April 29th 7 Leopard 1A5DK tanks where ordered to relief an observation post that was shelled for the 28th time. When they arrived they where engaged by Serbian forces. Initially a small drawback in a more protected area was ordered but as the attacks on the tanks continued and airsupport was denied the tank commander decided to engage the enemy forces. In total 72 shells where fired wrecking havoc on the Serbian positions. 5 tanks and the personel of the observation post where able to get back the same day, the 2 other tanks took few days longer to reach the home base again. More on this mission can be read here and here.


Leopard I Models


There are several models of Leopard I's available. Revell has a Leopard 1A5 (Kit No.03115) while Italeri releases a A2 (Kit No. 7031) and A4 version (Kit No. 7070). I wanted to build a A5DK version which is basically an A4 version with the electronics and sighting systems of a A5 version. The main differences from the A4 version are:


  1. A box on the rear of the turret
  2. A sort of periscope
  3. More advanced optics
  4. Even more advanced optics I presume but I could not find out for sure
  5. Boxes for the tools (the A4 version had them strapped to the hull)
Since there is no Leopard I A5DK model available in 1/72 I build these modifications myself. Also I removed some recesses from the turret which don't seems to be there on the real vehicle (at least not so prominent) and replaced the bars around the smoke dischargers as well. The detail of the Italeri model is comparable with the detail in the Revell model but the fit is not so good. In the front of the upper hull there is a pin designed to fit in a slot in the lower hull. These can best be removed since they don't fit in each other and prevent a good connection between the lower and upper hull.

I painted my as a UN vehicle so it was 100% white except for the tracks and rubber wheel rims. I painted the sides of the hull black, on the real vehicle these will be white no doubt but that can't be seen due to the shadows from the side skirts. To mimic this effect I painted the sides of the hull black. I could have done a better job painting the markings though.

Italeri's model is a good model when it comes to the detail but the fit of the parts could be a bit better. An omission on this model is the lack of guide teeth on the middle of the innersurface of the tracks. All in all it isn't a bad model though.